parenting_seminar_lg

COURSES: SUMMER 2011

Parenting Seminar

“Using Emotional Intelligence to Raise Compassionate and Resilient Children”

Sunday, June 12

12:30–5:30 p.m.

ADMISSION

$50 General

$40 Skirball Members

$30 Full-Time Students


ABOUT THE PROGRAM

In this seminar, participants learn to help their children become emotionally intelligent and find ways to express their feelings authentically and appropriately.

Through a keynote presentation and multiple workshops, participants will learn how to use Mindsight with their children to help them discover their feelings as a source of strength.

Techniques for cultivating resilience and well-being will be explored. The seminar will also enable parents and caregivers to strengthen bonds with children, leading to stronger families and communities.

Designed for parents, expectant parents, mental health care practitioners, and teachers, the program includes the keynote lecture and two ninety-minute workshops, Session A and Session B.

Dr. Joan A. Friedman will be offering a worshop during Session B, from 4:00pm till 5:30pm.


Raising Emotionally Healthy Twins

Facilitator: Joan Friedman, PhD, author of Emotionally Healthy Twins

Drawing on her experience as a twin, the mother of twins, and a psychotherapist specializing in twins, Dr. Friedman outlines seven key concepts for helping twins develop into self-realized, resilient individuals. Her current research about adult twin development will enhance parental awareness about twins’ ongoing emotional growth.



I want to thank everyone who filled out the survey.  More than 250 people participated, from ages 18 to 85, and I continue to receive responses every day. I was surprised by some findings and validated by others.  More than ever, I am convinced about my book‘s relevance since so many twin pairs are hungry for information and advice concerning their relationship to their twin.  The majority of respondents were very motivated to understand the aspects of their twin relationship that contribute to feelings of sadness, confusion, and fear.  While a small percentage of people were incredulous that being a twin would have any unpleasant or negative consequences, most authentically acknowledged difficulties and desired help in resolving them.  Many twin pairs are attempting to work out their issues so that the twinship can maintain its integrity alongside other primary relationships.
 
I was not surprised by the fact that there were only a handful of respondents who expressed unmitigated resentment and estrangement from their twin.  The few who did so described years of legitimate frustration and angst.  The segment where I appeared on the Rachel Ray Show entitled “I Hate My Twin” a few years ago was an exaggerated and sensationalized ploy geared to generate audience ratings and publicity.  Like so many survey respondents, the young women on this show were struggling to understand and rework their issues with separation and individuation.  Presently both are doing well – living in separate cities, pursuing different career paths, and appreciating their cherished connection.  It is imperative that non-twins along with society-at-large recognize that twins, just like singletons, have expectable developmental struggles with their siblings. Conflict does not signal that they hate each other nor insinuate that they are no longer close. Twins’ yearnings to forge other intimate relationships without alienating or hurting their twin emerge as the salient struggle.
 
 I do want to mention the many poignant stories shared by twins who describe how their powerful connection to their twin helped them survive traumatic events such as the death of a loved one, divorce, and illness.  The multiple references to fear about twin loss reflect the love and devotion that many twins feel for each other.  Also, the diverse parenting styles reported by twin pairs were intriguing.
 
 Thanks again for your continuing interest in and support for my work.  I will keep you updated on my research and the book’s publication.



Everything You Want to Know About TWINS!!!
This event is a wonderful opportunity to learn about twins from an emotional, sociological and biological perspective.
If you still have unanswered questions, feel free to visit me at my book signing after the panel discussion.
Where: UCLA Fowler Museum of Cultural History, Lenart Auditorium
When: Tuesday, May 18 @ 7:00 pm
RSVP: darwin@socgen.ucla.edu or (310) 267-5471
Admission: Free (parking is $10)


Twin Bliss Wish List

Date: Tuesday March 25, 2008
Posted in: Twin bliss

Jennifer Lopez’s adorable infants appear on the cover of People Magazine with the caption “Twin Bliss”. While most of us remember that blissful feeling when our twins were born, we also remember those less than blissful moments when both babies were crying at the same time, not sleeping at the same time, and eating all the time.

Twin bliss for most moms of twins might not include diamond engraved rattles or 600 count Egyptian cotton linen. Rather, it may be something like this . . .

My Twin Bliss Wish List:

All kidding aside, authentic bliss is sometimes recognizing – albeit in hindsight – that doing the best you can in challenging times helps generate an inner bliss that evolves into strength, resilience, and mastery.